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Legacy's Cardigan Welsh Corgis


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 Meet the Legacy Legend Team  

Legacy
Sharon Wilson
864-787-1680
legacycorgi@bellsouth.net

Legend
Cydne Clark
423-677-8637
cydcowgirl@aol.com

www.legacycorgi.com

Many changes have occurred in 2013 and the beginning of a new year brings renewed hope and anticipation of all things new.

I am the proud mother of four grown children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandson. They range in age from infancy to 22 years.  Our last grandchild was born in July of 2014.

My love for animals and especially dogs goes back to when I was a small child. Once I learned that the sport of showing dogs was open to me, I jumped in with both feet!

I retired January 21, 2011 after 32 ½ years of teaching Special Education and I am able to pursue my passion of showing dogs.  My first breed was the Bulldog. I began showing, raising and loving this breed in the early 80’s. My greatest claim to fame was CH Legacy's Cajun Zeus "Jax" who was the #1 bulldog in 1998 and 1999. He is also in the Bulldog Club’s Hall of Fame. I will always love and admire the bulldogs, but I was smitten with the cardigans. My love for cardigans continued to grow and we slowly made the transformation from bulldogs to strictly cardigans during the late 90's.

I saw my first cardigan being groomed on a table by my handler. She was a stunning blue merle with bright blue eyes. I thought to myself-I have GOT to have one of these. I got on the breeders waiting and a couple of years down the road we purchased “Misty”

The name Legacy was chosen as a tribute to "Misty" better known as, CH Barr's Star Sweeper of Shaj's. This was a beautiful blue merle bitch from the Aragorn line. She was campaigned in the late 80's and had several nice wins. The night before I was to take her to be bred, she ran out my front door at full speed onto a busy road and was killed. Misty was a member of our family and we were devastative. I wanted another cardigan with the same bloodline. We had to wait several years before getting another one. In the meantime we continued to show bulldogs and began using the prefix Legacy as a tribute to Misty in 1990. 

There have been at least 70 cardigans I have owned or bred that have gotten their AKC championship. Several of our brood bitches are ROMs levels. Others have gone on to excel in herding, agility, tracking and obedience. My focus is in the conformation ring. I so hope to expand my horizons soon and begin training both myself and a dog for agility.

The Legend part is the kennel name of my dear friend and dog partner, Cydne Clark. We have been friends for many years and share the same values and goals so we joined forces a few years ago and co-own most of your cardigans together. You will see both of us in most of the photos on the website. I am the short redhead and she is the tall one! We are so proud of the line we have created! There seems to be nothing our cardigans can’t achieve!

Our biggest brag goes to GCH Legacy Legend’s Run For The Triple Crown. He is one of a few GOLD level Grand Champion in the breed. He is quite the comedian both in the ring and at home. He loves to entertain the audience with his “squirreling” as we call it when he sits up on his rear waiting for attention for someone! He won yet another Award of Excellence at the Eukanuba Dog Show in Dec. (this is his second in two years) and Best Bred By as well. He has been exclusively owner handled through his show career and has ranked in the top ten of the breed for the past three years. He also won an Award of Excellence at the Eukanuba Dog Show in 2012 and an Award of Merit at the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Show in 2013.

There are many cardigan success stories, one of which is MACH2 CH Legacy's Heart Stealer "Bandit". Bandit was the first male breed champion to achieve the status of Master Agility Champion. His offspring are excelling in agility, tracking and obedience. Another is Legacy’s Keeps U In Suspense VCD1, CDX, RE, TDX “Spencer”. The blue merles will always be my favorites.  Currently we have a young male cardigan, GCH Legacy Legend’s Run For The Triple Crown “Cain” (Gold Level) who has ranked in the top ten of the breed for the past three years.

We do not breed many litters each year. A great deal of planning is done before a litter is bred. We screen our potential puppy owners and work hard to be sure that you are paired with the puppy that best suits you. We specialize in the blue merles, but other colors are available. Many times you will have to get on the waiting list for your new family edition. Always remember “good things come to those that wait!”

Something New and Something Blue. The Wilson's first Great Grandson, Camden born 1-4-2008

Frequently asked questions about the Cardigan Welsh Corgi breed!

WHAT IS A CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI?

WHAT DO CARDIGANS LOOK LIKE?

WHAT IS REQUIRED IN MAINTAINING A CWC?

DO CARDIGANS ADJUST TO MULTIPLE DOG HOMES?

SHOULD I GET A MALE OR FEMALE?

WHAT IS THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN OF THE CARDIGAN?

WHAT ARE SOME HEALTH PROBLEMS CARDIGANS HAVE?

HOW ARE CARDIGAN AND THE PEMBROKE DIFFERENT?

WHAT COAT COLORS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE CARDIGAN?

WHAT ABOUT THOSE BIG EARS!

ARE CARDIGANS GOOD WITH CHILDREN?

I LIVE IN AN APARTMENT, IS A CARDIGAN RIGHT FOR ME?

ARE CARDIGANS HARD TO TRAIN?

ADDITIONAL NOTES!



WHAT IS A CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI?

The Cardigan is a small but hardy bred dog. It originates from Wales. As a highly valued breed, it initially only served to assist in herding cattle and sheep. Throughout the decades, however, it has also become very valuable as a family dog, serving as protector and companion as well.

WHAT DO CARDIGANS LOOK LIKE?

The Cardigan is a totally separate breed from the tailless Pembroke Welsh Corgi. The Cardigan is a descendent from the Tekdal or Dachshund family. It is a long, low fox-like dog. A high quality  Cardigan should have large upright ears, a brushy tail, and moderate bone structure with the front legs slightly bowed around a deep chest. The length of a Cardigan is a Welsh yard. That is they range from  36 to 43 inches from the tip of their noses to the tip of their tails. The average shoulder height of a male is 12 inches, with the females being slightly shorter.

We try to produce Cardigans that mirror the AKC Standard, which states, "… a small, sturdy, but powerful dog capable of endurance and speed."  

WHAT MAINTENANCE IS REQUIRED WITH A CWC?

As stated in our Legacy Cardigan contract, the Cardigan should be provided with a daily exercise regimen to insure good health.  A routine exercise program, a good diet, fresh water, and inside living accommodations are a must. The dog should also have annual veterinary visits and vaccinations according to AVMA guidelines. Cardigans require minimal grooming. The double coat repels dirt that is easily removed with a fine pin brush. The Cardigan coat is an all weather coat and is generally clean and odorless. It often amazes new Cardigan owners when they put their wet, dirty corgi in their crate, only to return and their dog is clean. The coat of a Cardigan naturally repels dirt and it simply falls off. All that remains is a small amount of dirt in the bottom of the crate. The ears should be kept clean and the nails cut short. I bathe my dogs every two weeks on the average. They shed once or twice a year.

DO CARDIGANS ADJUST TO MULTIPLE DOG HOMES?

Many Legacy Cardigans have gone to homes that have other dogs in the home. These dogs may either be Cardigans or different breeds. They really enjoy the companionship of other dogs. Cardigans are like potato chips, you can’t have just one! Many puppy buyers have returned to purchase a second or even third Cardigan!

SHOULD I GET A MALE OR FEMALE?

Both sexes make loving, loyal, devoted pets. Females ideally range in size from 25-34 pounds, with males ranging from 30-38 pounds. All pet puppies are sold on limited registration and neutering and spaying is required. Once this is done the males will not mark their territory and females with not attract unwanted males. 

WHAT IS THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN OF THE CARDIGAN?

The average lifespan of a Cardigan is 12-15 years. However, just as some people live longer, so do some Cardigans. It is not unheard of for a Cardigan to live up to 16 years of age or longer.

WHAT ARE SOME HEALTH PROBLEMS CARDIGANS HAVE?

The Legacy line rarely displays hereditary defects of other breeds, such as disk problems, cornea cysts, and V. M. D. Our breeding stock is PRA clear, which means Progressive Retinal Atrophy. In a nutshell, our dogs are healthy and live long full lives.

HOW ARE CARDIGAN AND THE PEMBROKE DIFFERENT?

First note that the Cardigan and the Pembroke come from totally different origins dating back to the beginning of time. The Pembroke originated from the same lines as Terriers, Spitz, and Schipperkes. These dogs have a tendency to be hyperactive and yippy. Many Pembroke breeders will not recommend their pups for homes with young children.

The main difference between the two breeds is the Cardigan's obvious tail, which is absent on the Pembroke. The ears of a Cardigan are bigger and rounded more than the smaller, triangular shaped ears of the Pembroke. The Cardigan is a larger dog and is longer than the Pembroke. A high quality Cardigan front should have forelegs that bow out a bit to surround the chest cavity. The Pembroke has a much straighter front. The Cardigan has a deeper chest to enable a larger heart and increased lung capacity. This enables the Cardigan to perform his work on the hills of Cardiganshire, Wales.

The Pembroke is much easier to find due to the large number of litters bred each year.  We are striving to insure that only top quality Cardigans are bred.  Thus we stand behind our Legacy Cardigan Welsh Corgis, and maintain our breeding to be sound and within the AKC standards for the Cardigan Welsh Corgi breed. Because we use only sound breeding procedures, those established as AKC standards, we stand behind our Legacy Cardigan Welsh Corgis.

WHAT COAT COLORS ARE THERE TO CHOOSE FROM?

As opposed to the Pembroke, Cardigans come in a wide range of colors. Colors currently accepted in the standard include: tri-color (black, white with tan or brindle points), blue merles (with tan or brindle points), brindles of various shades, and closely resembling the Pembroke are the sable and reds. The Cardigan normally has white flashings on the neck, chest, feet and tip of the tail. The blue merles, a Legacy specialty, are my personal favorites!

WHAT ABOUT THOSE BIG EARS!

A correct Cardigan should have large and prominent ears that are in proportion to the size of the dog. Their hearing is extremely acute, and they easily distinguish between strange noises and familiar sounds thus making them excellent watchdogs. As working dogs, they use their acute hearing to hear the approaching kick from a cow or sheep. They would then roll out of the way with the use of their long bodies and short legs. When they are young pups their ears droop. There is a wide range in the time frame that Cardigan ears begin lifting. Most start showing signs of trying to stand between the ages of 8 and 12 weeks. When young puppies teethe, the ears may droop, this is perfectly normal.

ARE CARDIGANS GOOD WITH CHILDREN?

 Our children were raised with our Cardigans in the home. Cardigans make excellent family pets! The corgis would often try and ‘herd’ our children and their friends. They tried their best to get them in a central location. Cardigans make excellent pets for children. However, young children should not be allowed to pick up a Cardigan. Children should be taught the correct way to pick up a Cardigan. Their center of balance is just under the chest. Put one hand under the chest behind the front legs, with the other hand supporting the hindquarters. Never allow a young puppy to jump off furniture or go down flights of stairs in the beginning. Remember that going downstairs is hard for a Cardigan due to their short legs.

I LIVE IN AN APARTMENT, IS A CARDIGAN RIGHT FOR ME?

Legacy Cardigans are living in the country with lots of acreage and in high-rise apartment buildings in New York. One of our Legacy’s Cardigan is a fulltime resident of a nursing home where he works as a therapy dog. This breed can ADAPT to your lifestyle! They do not require a lot of exercise. Long walks or running around the backyard are fine. They also get a lot of exercise playing about the house, especially, if they have another dog or cat for a companion.

ARE CARDIGANS HARD TO TRAIN?

We strongly recommend crate training to housebreak a puppy. The Cardigan is a dog that wants to be truly involved with his family. He is full of fun and will shower his family with devotion and sensible affection. Caring for his family comes naturally to this intelligent, alert, and responsible dog. Cardigans are highly trainable and often are housebroken before they are 8 weeks of age. We strongly recommend basic obedience classes for all new Cardigan owners. This training can start as soon as the new puppy has settled in to their new home. Obedience classes are fun and will help to develop a deeper relationship between you and your Cardigan.

ADDITIONAL NOTES!

Thank you for considering a Legacy’s Cardigan Welsh Corgi for your next pet, companion, or show dog. Legacy’s Cardigans excel in obedience, tracking, agility, herding, and therapy work. We always shine in the show ring with the majority of our show puppies finishing from the puppy classes. Many of our Legacy’s Cardigan Welsh Corgis have taken Best of Breed over specials from the 6-9 month old puppy classes.

I will be glad to mail you an information packet if you email me your address or I can send a packet via email. We also welcome scheduled visitors to meet our dogs!

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